Clan Systems in a Matrilineal Society

LaDonna Brown, Tribal Anthropologist, Department of History & Culture, Chickasaw Nation

LaDonna Brown, Tribal Anthropologist for the Chickasaw Nation Department of History & Culture, explains how the clan system provided a societal structure for the southeastern tribes. All clans are matrilineal, so each child “belongs” to her mother and her mother’s side of the family.

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